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MOVING MOUNTAINS

The mountains moved last Saturday. During my childhood my Nimbu Didi used to say mother earth shrugs once in a while when the sin of us humans gets too hard to bear. She knew a thing or two about mountains moving having experienced the "Nabbe Saal ko Bhuinchalo', the quake that devastated Kathmandu and the neighbouring areas in 1934 A.D.

Mountains moved upwards by perhaps as much as a meter experts say, making Mt. Everest even taller. The world took notice in an unprecedented outpouring of grief and sympathy. The world assisted the needy by supplying essentials in giant aircrafts our only international airport had never seen before. The world has pledged to restore our monuments to their former glory.

Nepalese youth in the thousands have mobilised themselves to aid the unfortunate, save the dying, rescue those trapped in the rubble that was once a village, a town, a city. Brave men have ventured to areas where lady fortune fears to tread.

Nepal's residing gods might have lost their physical housing but their presence is pushing us all to rebuild, restore and resurrect an ancient land where time always stands still. This will pass. Faith is moving mountains here.

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